NORTH CAROLINA
STATE HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICE
ASSISTANCE
TO
CUMBERLAND COUNTY

Updated 12/31/99

ARCHAEOLOGY

Archaeological surveys, including a 1985 county-wide effort, have resulted in over 850 prehistoric and historic archaeological sites being recorded with the North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Excavations at the Fayetteville Arsenal along Hay Street and at Cool Springs are notable projects in Fayetteville.

ARCHITECTURAL SURVEY

Architectural surveys of Fayetteville/Cumberland County in the late 1970s and early 1980s were supported by state and federal preservation grants administered and assisted by the Historic Preservation Office.

GRANTS

Architectural restoration and archaeology projects in the county have received a total of $54,313 in federal grants and $725,159 in state appropriations. Restoration projects have included work at the Fayetteville Arsenal site, Barge's Tavern, Cape Fear Regional Theater, Cool Springs, Liberty Row and Liberty Point, the Market House, Orange Street School, and the Oval Ballroom. Preparation of the Hope Mills historic preservation plan was assisted by a $15,000 state grant in 1994.

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

There are sixty-one Cumberland County listings in the National Register of Historic Places. They include rail stations, churches (Big Rockfish Presbyterian, Cape Fear Baptist, Evans Metropolitan AME Zion, Falcon Tabernacle), Civil War sites (Confederate Breastworks, Arsenal), early taverns (Barge's, Cool Spring), public buildings (Frances B. Stein Library), Cross Creek Cemetery No. 1 in Fayetteville, and several historic districts such as Haymount and Pope Air Force Base. The Market House in Fayetteville has been recognized as a National Historic Landmark. In 1998 the Historic Preservation Office awarded a federal grant to the city of Fayetteville for preparation of a National Register nomination for the Downtown Fayetteville Historic District.

LOCAL PRESERVATION COMMISSIONS

The Historic Preservation Office provides consultation assistance to the Fayetteville Historic Resources Commission, which oversees thirty-five locally designated landmarks and two historic districts. The City of Fayetteville became a Certified Local Government in 1999.

PRESERVATION TAX CREDITS

Six income-producing tax credit projects have been completed in Cumberland County at a total construction investment of $8,202,500, including Liberty Point Store and Prince Charles Hotel in Fayetteville; eight additional projects are currently undergoing renovation, including the Sedberry-McKethan Building in Fayetteville. The Historic Preservation Office reviews and provides restoration technical services for all tax credit projects.

PUBLIC EDUCATION

The Historic Preservation Office assisted the Junior Service League of Fayetteville in publishing Historic Fayetteville and Cumberland County in 1976, featuring the historic architecture of the county. The Historic Preservation Office staff has also given lectures to historical organizations in the county, including a talk on the Oval Ballroom to the local Colonial Dames Chapter which helped provide momentum for the current restoration. Other events conducted in the county by the Historic Preservation Office include a workshop on the Secretary of the Interior's Rehabilitation Standards for the Fayetteville Historic Resources Commission in 1998 and Section 106 compliance training for Pope Air Force Base civilian and military personnel in 1996.

RESTORATION

Technical restoration services by the Historic Preservation Office have been supplied to several buildings at Fayetteville State University, Pope Air Force Base, Fort Bragg, the Fayetteville Woman's Club, Averasboro Battleground, the Cumberland County Courthouse, and the Museum of the Cape Fear. Additional properties assisted include Oak Grove, the Smith House, Barge's Tavern, the Belden-Horne House, Fayetteville Market House, the Orange Street School, St. John's Episcopal Church, the Kyle House, Cool Springs Tavern, Liberty Point, and several commercial buildings in downtown Fayetteville that are currently undergoing rehabilitation. Restoration of the Oval Ballroom, perhaps the state's finest Federal style interior space, was completed in 1999.


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